Clarks

Clarks Shoes For Women

It began with a flash of inspiration. It was 1825 in the tiny English village of Street, in the county of Somerset. James Clark was busy working at the tannery owned by his brother, Cyrus.
Among the sheepskin rugs, the off-cuts and cast-offs were piling up when James had a brainwave. “Slippers!” he exclaimed and the Brown Petersburg was born. Sales were soon averaging more than 1000 pairs a month.

Within a few years the brothers’ pioneering and entrepreneurial spirit was rewarded with two awards at the ‘Great Exhibition Of The Works Of Industry Of All Nations’. Held in London’s Hyde Park and with an average daily attendance of 43,000, the event was organized by Prince Albert to showcase modern industrial technology and design.

And so began a remarkable story of vision, innovation and invention; a story that continues to unfold to this day.

Since the ‘Brown Petersburg’ slipper made its debut almost 200 years ago, our footwear has been catching the eye and capturing the imagination of people in all four corners of the globe.

Emerging from the buttoned-up days of the Victorian era, we created stylish shoes that showed a ladies ankle at its best. In the 1920s there was a t-bar pump tailor-made for the Jazz Age and the newly liberated women who were kicking up their heels on both sides of the Atlantic. In the 30s, the chorus line of Charles B Cochran’s Revue stepped into the spotlight in Clarks Colorado sandals; in the 40s, with leather in short supply during World War II, we designed a shoe with a unique, hinged sole made from dried beechwood.

1950 saw the arrival of the Clarks Desert Boot. Designed by Nathan Clark and modelled on a shoe made in the bazaars of Cairo, it was a world first in smart casual footwear and, over the decades, has been the footwear of choice for everyone from teddy boys and mods to Parisienne revolutionaries, pop stars and Hollywood A-listers.

Not only that. The purity of its form is a constant source of inspiration for our designers. Also the essence of cool, then as now, is the Wallabee┬«. Inspired by a moccasin made by a company called Sioux, it was styled around the original Clarks nature form last, made its debut in the mid-1960s and to this day effortlessly bridges the divide between cult and classic. As enduringly cool is the Polyveldt. Launched in the 1970s, 40 years after it first appeared it’s back by public demand, re-engineered but still instantly recognisable.

And throughout our history we’ve happily worked and collaborated with like minds; people who share our passion for style, quality and craft. The roll call of names in the last 50 years alone reads like a guide to the best of British and includes photographer, David Bailey, and model, Jean Shrimpton; legendary fashion designer, Hardy Amies; Eley Kishomoto; Foot Patrol; the ‘queen of prints’, Orla Kiely, Musto, world leaders in the field of fit-for-purpose performance clothing and Norton, makers of some of motorcycling’s most iconic machines.

Clarks Shoes For Women It began with a flash of inspiration. It was 1825 in the tiny English village of Street, in the county of Somerset. James Clark was busy working at the tannery owned by his brother, Cyrus. Among the sheepskin rugs, the off-cuts and cast-offs were piling up when James had a brainwave. "Slippers!" he exclaimed and the Brown Petersburg was born. Sales were soon averaging more than 1000 pairs a month. Within a few years the brothers' pioneering and entrepreneurial spirit was rewarded with two awards at the 'Great Exhibition Of The Works Of Industry Of All Nations'. Held in London's Hyde Park and with an average daily attendance of 43,000, the event was organized by Prince Albert to showcase modern industrial technology and design. And so began a remarkable story of vision, innovation and invention; a story that continues to unfold to this day. Since the 'Brown Petersburg' slipper made its debut almost 200 years ago, our footwear has been catching the eye and capturing the imagination of people in all four corners of the globe. Emerging from the buttoned-up days of the Victorian era, we created stylish shoes that showed a ladies ankle at its best. In the 1920s there was a t-bar pump tailor-made for the Jazz Age and the newly liberated women who were kicking up their heels on both sides of the Atlantic. In the 30s, the chorus line of Charles B Cochran's Revue stepped into the spotlight in Clarks Colorado sandals; in the 40s, with leather in short supply during World War II, we designed a shoe with a unique, hinged sole made from dried beechwood. 1950 saw the arrival of the Clarks Desert Boot. Designed by Nathan Clark and modelled on a shoe made in the bazaars of Cairo, it was a world first in smart casual footwear and, over the decades, has been the footwear of choice for everyone from teddy boys and mods to Parisienne revolutionaries, pop stars and Hollywood A-listers. Not only that. The purity of its form is a constant source of inspiration for our designers. Also the essence of cool, then as now, is the Wallabee®. Inspired by a moccasin made by a company called Sioux, it was styled around the original Clarks nature form last, made its debut in the mid-1960s and to this day effortlessly bridges the divide between cult and classic. As enduringly cool is the Polyveldt. Launched in the 1970s, 40 years after it first appeared it's back by public demand, re-engineered but still instantly recognisable. And throughout our history we've happily worked and collaborated with like minds; people who share our passion for style, quality and craft. The roll call of names in the last 50 years alone reads like a guide to the best of British and includes photographer, David Bailey, and model, Jean Shrimpton; legendary fashion designer, Hardy Amies; Eley Kishomoto; Foot Patrol; the 'queen of prints', Orla Kiely, Musto, world leaders in the field of fit-for-purpose performance clothing and Norton, makers of some of motorcycling's most iconic machines.

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